Monday, November 14

Super Moon


Moon taken 12.30am 14th November 2016
Taken  with my Sony Cyber-shot Compact Camera with 30x Optical Zoom
The impressive sight happens when a full moon is closest to Earth. It orbits our planet in an oval shape so sometimes it comes closer to us than at other times. To us, the moon appears 30% brighter and 14% bigger. 



They're fairly frequent, although November's supermoon will be a once-in-a-generation sight. There are six supermoons in 2016. We've already had four, and after next week there's one on December 14. 

It might look close, but ofcourse it's not that close. November 14's full moon will be the closest for 70 years. The moon will come 221,524 miles from Earth - almost touching distance in space terms.

The closest full moon of the whole of the 21st century will fall on December 6, 2052.




The name SuperMoon was coined by astrologer Richard Nolle in 1979, arbitrarily defined as:
...a new or full moon which occurs with the Moon at or near (within 90% of) its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit (perigee). In short, Earth, Moon and Sun are all in a line, with Moon in its nearest approach to Earth.
Nolle also claimed that the moon causes "geophysical stress" during the time of a supermoon. Nolle never outlined why the 90% was chosen.
The term supermoon is not used within the astronomical community, which uses the term perigee-syzygy or perigee full/new moon. Perigee is the point at which the Moon is closest in its orbit to the Earth, and syzygy is when the Earth, the Moon and the Sun are aligned, which happens at every full or new moon. Hence, a supermoon can be regarded as a combination of the two, although they do not perfectly coincide each time.